Articulating Urgency

The process of creating a trauma-sensitive school begins when an individual’s or small group of staff have a sense of urgency about the need to address an important school priority.  When a significant number of staff determine to address this urgent priority in a trauma-sensitive way the seed for making change can take hold.

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New Video Discussion Guide Available Now

TLPI Video Discussion Guide-Why We Need Trauma-Sensitive Schools

Since the release of the video last fall, we received a large number of requests to share the video. Many who contacted us let us know that there was a desire to start a trauma-sensitive schools discussion in their own communities. In response to these requests, we developed a discussion guide to go along with the video.

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A Trauma-Sensitive School Addresses Students’ Needs in Holistic Ways

A Trauma-Sensitive School Addresses Students’ Needs in Holistic Ways

A trauma-sensitive school addresses students’ needs in holistic ways, taking into account their relationships, self-regulation, academic competence, and physical and emotional well-being. Within the school, there is recognition that these domains are inextricably linked and an understanding of the critical role they play in helping students succeed.

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Welcome to the Trauma Sensitive Schools Learning Community

A Trauma-Sensitive School Addresses Students’ Needs in Holistic Ways

We have been hard at work updating and improving the format and content of our learning community and we appreciate your patience as we launch this effort. This summer, we are in the beginning phase of establishing our learning community and plan to have more robust content by the fall of 2016.

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Helping All Children Feel Safe

Teacher-with-kids-in-corridor

The second common attribute of a trauma-sensitive school is that the school supports all students to feel safe-physically, socially, emotionally, and academically. A child’s traumatic response, and the associated difficulty in learning, are often rooted in real or perceived threats to his or her safety, undermining their fundamental sense of well-being. Because of this, it is important to ensure that students feel safe, not just in their classrooms but also on the playground, in the hallway, in the cafeteria, on the bus, in the gym, and on the walk to and from school.

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